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Catch More Flies

January 1, 2013 in CPS, DFS, family court

A determined young lady has written dozens of e-mails over the past couple of weeks – many of them were simply horrendous (sorry girl). This letter was written in response to one of them.

Dear Friend,

I have provided links, advice and legal resources on Kidjacked. My phone and e-mail are being blown up with requests for help and questions galore. I am sorry but I do this in my spare time and frankly I don’t have much of that.

I maintain over 200 websites (both ours and our clients websites) — my husband and I work from home. The only money I make from Kidjacked comes from the ads that are found on each page (and we only get paid when someone actually clicks on an ad – DO NOT click ads to make us money, though, only ever click the ads you’re actually interested in).

Where are all the kids?

Where are all the kids?

I wish that I could do this full-time and be there to walk everyone through the steps they need to take to fight their cases, but the fact is I simply don’t have that kind of time and most people can’t afford to pay me for it. I have never asked anyone for a dime for myself or my family — and we are not wealthy. Heck, we drive a 1999 vehicle that we will drive until the tires fall off.

I will offer you my best advice:

  • When e-mailing your lawyer, your caseworker and others, it is crucial that you avoid threatening them in any way, no matter how badly you want to serve them their head on a platter.
  • Each and every letter or e-mail should be checked for spelling, grammar and content. (Put your best face forward.) This information can and often is presented in court and can be used against you.
  • Grandma always said you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. Your letters and telephone calls need to be eloquent, yet firm. There is always a way to get your point across without being crude and insulting. Practice until you get it right!
  • Enlist your friends and relatives to help with your research. Have someone else read your letters before you send them off and edit them if necessary. Censor yourself. Seek the council of others who have fought the system and won their case. Don Lyons fought and was able to get his children returned. He wrote a book about it. Purchase or borrow books like his. [Get the book now: Kids For Money]
  • Form local support groups [Use the box under the calendar to select your state, then scroll to the bottom of the page.]
  • Picket your local court. Hand out pamphlets; they are easy to create. Be sure to include the URL to Kidjacked.com. Spread the word and join with others.
  • Request letters of recommendation from friends, family, professionals (doctors, pastors, co-workers) who know you and your family; present them in court. Make copies for your attorney and caseworkers.
  • Know the laws in your state. Become an expert in CPS guidelines and regulations. File an official complaint when those laws and guidelines are violated. Each State or County has their own regulations they are required to follow. The only way to force an investigation is to file an official complaint. Often the complaint procedure is available online, if not you must request the information directly from CPS — they are required by law to provide it to you.
  • Most county agencies have an “ombudsman” you can contact to assist you. Some are helpful and other are not. It’s worth a shot to try.
  • If you discover CPS agents are not in compliance with the laws in your state (or county), you can contact your congressman. The U.S. House of Representatives is responsible for oversight of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Visit the website, locate your representative by using the list or search functions on the site. Call their office, ask to speak to the aide who handles DHHS issues. Briefly explain your situation and the violations that have occurred. Do not go into your entire case history.The aide will request you fax or mail your supporting documentation and a release form, which allows the aide to investigate your allegations. Requesting an investigation is often enough to force CPS to clean up their act because they will receive notification that they are under investigation along with the allegations made against them.
  • You’ve heard it said the squeaky wheel gets the grease. It’s true. Be polite and be firm, but don’t stop. If you can turn up the heat on CPS workers, they will often dismiss their case against you out of pure frustration and fear. You must make it more costly to keep your children in custody or harass you than it is for them to send them home and leave you alone. This means keeping on the pressure.

I have spent over an hour writing this e-mail. I will be posting it on “Jacked Up,” the Kidjacked blog in hopes that this information will be helpful to others.

I wish you well in handling your case. Please send me an occasional update (written “ready to post”) and I will be happy to post the information to Kidjacked, in hopes that the information will provide encouragement and details that will assist other parents in gaining the return of their children. None of us can do it all alone but if we each pitch in and do our part, we can make a difference.

This is my small part.

Best wishes!

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Fighting Fire With Fire

September 17, 2011 in Child Protective Services, corruption, due process, family court, family rights

The seal of the United States Department of He...

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For years I have been telling people that the best way to fight the system is to make it more expensive for them to fight you than to give in to your demands. Those wonderful folks “protecting children” at the Department of Health and Human Services think they are above the law — and many operate their agencies like they are living in the Wild Wild West. Anything goes.

While you might feel helpless, you actually have much more power than you realize. I always begin my fight with prayer, asking God to guide me, give me wisdom, understanding and any other specifics on my current circumstance. God won’t fight our fight for us, but God sure makes a tremendous ally.

Then it’s time to lay out a battle plan. Questions you should be asking and documenting:

  • Who are the players? — You must know your opponent if you are defeat him or her. Create a list. What do you know about the judge, the caseworker, and the other people involved in your case.
  • What laws have been broken? — List the statute(s), specific instances, times, dates, etc. Gather as much evidence as possible.
  • Put together a support team. — These are people you can trust. This list should include people who can help you with your case, read reports, assist with research and help to keep your spirits up. Stop answering the calls of those who are negative or bring you down. You must stay focused.
  • Put together an attack plan. — Passive parents rarely see their children returned home. You must stop playing defense and go on the offensive and stay on the offensive. Hit them with what I like to call a shit storm. One complaint after another — preferably coming from different directions.

 

Once you have read the Child Welfare Policy Manual, both state and federal (most are well indexed so finding the laws that pertain to your own case is pretty simple, or just ask for help), you can file an official complaint with your local child welfare agency.

In order to file a complaint, you must request the proper forms from that agency. After filing an official complain with CPS/DHS/etc., call your U.S. House Representative, ask to speak with the aid who handles Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) complaints. Briefly explain what laws were broken. You must sign a request for an investigation before the legislative aid can begin an investigation.

Your local agency will be notified that they are under investigation by the federal government. They will not be happy about it — your case could well be closed faster than you can say “Kashisti”. It has happened in the past. Most often, if they have broken the law, they will be advised to close the case as quickly as possible.

Regardless, of what they do. The more eyes you have on your case, the better it will be for you and your children. Don’t stop there. Continue the offensive by bringing your cause to the people who make policy. The Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse & Neglect are involved with many federal agencies. Be sure to contact specific members of this group. Make it personal.

 

Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse & Neglect

About the Work Group

The amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) of 1988 created a Federal Inter-Agency Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect. The Task Force consisted of approximately 30 member agencies drawn from the eight Cabinet Departments and the Office of Personnel Management. The Director of the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN) was the statutory chairperson of the Task Force.

When the 1996 CAPTA amendments created an Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, replacing the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN), it also eliminated the requirement for a Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect.

However, the existing Task Force members agreed that it was important to maintain the connections and to continue their work. The name was changed to Federal Interagency Work Group on Child Abuse and Neglect as Task Forces have specific meanings and requirements under Federal law.

Current Activities

Since 1996, the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect has continued to lead and coordinate the Federal Interagency Workgroup on Child Abuse and Neglect (FEDIAWG). Over 40 Federal agencies are represented. The FEDIAWG meets in-person on a quarterly basis and various Subcommittees meet on a more regular basis via conference calls. The overall goals of the FEDIAWG are:

  • To provide a forum through which staff from relevant Federal agencies can communicate and exchange ideas concerning child maltreatment related programs and activities;
  • To collect information about Federal child maltreatment activities; and
  • To provide a basis for collective action through which funding and resources can be maximized.

There are three Subcommittees and related workgroups:

Domestic Violence Subcommittee
Prevention Subcommittee
Research Subcommittee: NIH Child Abuse and Neglect Working Group

[Find contact information and details. Be sure to scroll down.]

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Divorce and the Children

July 30, 2011 in domestic violence, family court, parent-child relationship

With about two million people getting divorced every year in the United States alone, and one and a half million children affected by these divorces, there’s clearly an urgent need to get through this process with dignity, respect and compassion. Unfortunately, this does not always happen and, as a result, children suffer. It’s in the news everyday and transcends social class.

Divorce Happens – This Doctor Helps Protect The Innocence Of Children
And Teaches Parents How To Minimize The Damage

July 30, 2011 – Dr. Mark Robert Banschick designed The Intelligent Divorce book series and The Online Family Stabilization Course as a way to help divorcing parents avoid the common mistakes that end up hurting children during a divorce. The mission of the project is to teach parents how to raise well-adjusted children despite the pressures that divorce puts on everyone.

Video: “It’s Working Out”

A blueprint that every adult should use as they go through a divorce, The Intelligent Divorce advocates on behalf of kids through books, an online course, seminars and a media campaign. Based on hundreds of case studies, current research and decades of experience, Dr. Banschick teaches parents how to handle divorce with dignity, strength and intelligence.

The first book in the series, Taking Care of Your Children (2010), focuses on the well being of kids by teaching parents effective communication strategies that help them gauge how their children are doing with the divorce. And, if their child is in trouble, Dr. Banschick’s pragmatic approach teaches parents how to make a positive difference.

The second book, Taking Care of Yourself (2011), helps parents take control of their lives by handling anger, pain and anxiety more productively; learning about finances and healthier living; and dealing realistically with the world of attorneys, therapists and difficult ex-spouses. On this note, the third book, scheduled to come out in 2012, centers around Dealing with a Difficult Ex.

Mark R. Banschick, M.D. is a child and adolescent psychiatrist. The Intelligent Divorce project evolved from his work as an expert witness in custody disputes. Dr. Banschick has appeared on the CBS Early Show, The Ricki Lake Show, WCBS TV Morning News, and has been quoted in The New York Times, Divorcemagazine.com, firstwivesworld.com, and regularly contributes to the Huffington Post.

Dr. Banschick is currently working with a production company on a sample pilot television show designed to educate the public about divorcing with your children in mind, despite the difficult feelings and power struggles that come with the territory.

For the two million people divorcing each year in this country and the one and a half million children who are affected, The Intelligent Divorce is a project worth pursuing. As part of a public outreach effort, Dr. Banschick is open to media contact and interviews on topics of divorce and parenting.

For more information please visit Dr. Banschick’s website, www.TheIntelligentDivorce.com

Cathy Meyer, Founder, DivorcedWomenOnLine.com: “It isn’t merely a book; it’s a tool that anyone going through a divorce should be required to implement. It belongs on the desk of all divorce lawyers, judges, child psychologists, and every divorced or divorcing parent.”

Drugs and CPS Research

May 15, 2007 in CPS

Survey Participants Needed

Parental Input Needed for Psychotropic medications and CPS/DCFS involvement

Are your children now or have they been placed on psychotropic drugs and been involved in a CPS/DCFS investigation? If you can answer yes, to both questions, Rhonda McEntire, needs your assistance.

Rhonda needs help:

I have been working on a degree for Doctorate in Counseling Psychology and now I’ve passed! It is time to do my research paper. My instructor was given a copy of my prospectus and she does not think I have access to parents who have children on psychotropic medications that will be willing to fill out a survey!

So, I am here to ask…Parents, caregivers, grandparents and foster parents… are you willing to complete a survey for me on psychotropic drugs and DCFS involvement?

Please if you are interested. I need to know right away how many people I can count on. And if you know anyone who is willing, I will snail mail them, or email them. I need as many people on board with this as I can get.

To participate in this important research project, contact: .

Thank you for your time and consideration!
Rhonda McEntire

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