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Kinship Care and Lies

July 6, 2012 in Child Protective Services, corruption, grandparents rights, West Virginia

I have 4 grandchildren that were placed in my home 4/26/2012, by Harrison County, WV CPS.

When my daughter in law had the baby last August she let the doctor know that she had been taking Subutex. She had previously had a problem with narcotic pain killers and had gone to the local clinic for help. They put her on Suboxone and when she got pregnant she had to switch to Subutex. But we could no longer afford for her to go to the clinic.

English: Suboxone tablet - both sides.

Suboxone tablet

She asked her OB about a regular prescription but he said he was not allowed to do that. So a friend was getting it for her.  Also, to make things worse she got my son also addicted to it.So, when she had the baby CPS was called, even though the baby’s system was drug free. They opened a case in February, 2012. Both parents were taking a minimum dose of Suboxone once every day. No one even had any idea that they were taking anything.

The children were always well taken care of, home was spotless, good meals always served, and they were very involved in the kids activities. But because of the addiction, the kids were removed 2 months after the case opened. This has gone from bad to worse.

The case worker told me that I was to keep the kids in their “normal” routine. I told her that the older ones always spent part of the summer in Ohio with their cousins and she said that was fine. So today she calls to tell me I had to get my granddaughter home today, they are not allowed to go out of state except for maybe a weekend and with me.

Also, she had asked me if I WANTED to certify as a foster home and I said I didn’t know, and she said well I will contact a home study and you can look over the paperwork. I did that and because I decided that some of the information they wanted was absolutely my own personal, private business (how much life insurance do I have. who is it with, etc) I decided I did not want to do that.

Then she said I could not keep the kids if I didn’t. And she also said that “WHEN” parental rights were terminated and the kids put up for adoption I would not be allowed to do that if I was not certified.

I want to know what I can do to fight this? Are my grandchildren going to have a lifetime of punishment by this woman? Why are they being punished?

 

S.H., West Virginia

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Kinship care vs Fostering

October 15, 2011 in California, DCF, DCFS, DHS, family rights, foster parents, grandparents rights, Idaho, Michigan

I’ve had several people in the past few weeks tell me that they wish to care for their own family members – as opposed to having them placed in foster care, with strangers. These grandparents, aunts, uncles and other close relatives are being told they must become certified foster parents.

Advocating for Children in Foster and Kinship Care: A Guide to Getting the Best out of the System for Caregivers and Practitioners Federal law requires that state social workers attempt to find suitable placement for “at risk” children, who are removed from their home. In many cases the state is merely paying lip-service and doesn’t actually follow the law.

This is a violation of federal law and the state can lose their federal funding. You should always report such violations of federal law to your U.S. House Representation. Call and request an investigation. You will need to provide them with a legal release form, along with the facts and any supporting documents.

Just today the Idaho Press-Tribune ran an interesting article:

In Idaho, more grandparents still in parental role

Many grandparents who take in grandchildren qualify for a $300 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families grant. The amount is the same regardless of the number of children in a family.

Grandparents also can become certified as foster parents, and take in their own grandchildren through the state system. That means more financial support. Monthly foster payments per child in Idaho range from $274 to $431 based on age; payments increase if children have special needs. Foster children get Medicaid cards and other benefits.

But many families don’t want to do that, Perry said. Some bristle at the idea of giving the state that much control over their families, even temporarily.

“They feel taking care of their own family is their responsibility,” he said.

Tracee Crawford, one of the leaders of the Grandparents as Parents of the Treasure Valley, a Southwest Idaho support group, said grandparents sometimes hesitate to ask for help of any kind, afraid that if they make trouble, their children will take the grandchildren away.

Becoming a legal guardian, another option, comes with its own complications, including steep legal costs, said Crawford.

She became part of a kin-care family when her daughter had cancer. Crawford cared for her and her grandson until her daughter died. She’s been in long legal battles with her former son-in-law over visitation rights with her grandson.

“To become a legal guardian, you have to prove a parent — your child — is unfit,” she said. “That’s really hard to do” — factually and emotionally.

Each state is different, which makes it difficult to know exactly what the law is your own state.

In my own case, I was shocked to find that while I was getting monthly kinship care checks from the State of California of ($357 – back in 2002), at the same time, another relative had a sibling to my grandson. The only difference was that they lived in Michigan; her checks from the State of Michigan – $123.  I felt bad for her because this child has autism and even in Michigan $123. doesn’t go far.

Be sure you check into your own states law, make a few phone calls, talk to an attorney and check out a few state websites before you sign anything. The choice you make could make a big difference in just how much help you are entitled to.

On that note, let me just remind you that if you accept money from the state, you accept all the strings that go along with that money, but it’s better than starving — maybe. We didn’t like giving up so much of our privacy, so we stopped received state funds many years ago – as soon as we could stand on our own two feet.

Knowledge is Power! Exercise your brain.

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Kinship Care Revoked

June 18, 2010 in Arizona, CPS, Washington

Kinship Care

I am a kinship provider to a grandchild. The parents have turned over their parental rights and our case is going into permanency planning. CPS asked us to adopt this child.

When the biological father heard about this (he lives in Arizona and has had little contact with anyone this entire three years we have cared for our grandson) he protested and stated that his parents were better to care for him. CPS is taking his side as we have a new social worker and my grandson wants to live with his father, as is natural for a child to want to live with a parent.

I wish I could start my own blog but I have posted a few concerns on line before and someone brought it to the attention of CPS. I defended what I wrote, but of course then I wasn’t on their list of bffs. So they see me as a meddling foster parent who they want to get out of the picture. After all these years I am now facing losing my grandson.

You may think that we have done something to deserve this, but I assure you we have not. I can give you an issue by issue list of the things we have done to follow the plan but you’re just gonna believe me or not.

My point of this email… CPS is watching. They are taking note of everything we do on line and using it to make their case – even when, especially when, they are dead wrong.

They are about to move a child into a family with active addiction, no job and I could go on. So, this nightmare continues…

I have reached out for help to numerous agencies, lawyers, politicians and supervisors, nothing. So I am giving it over to God and hope that the truth, the real truth, will be revealed. Thanks and I wish you the best.

Sam T.,
Washington

Kids Thrive With Family

January 26, 2009 in CPS, family court, foster care, Texas

Terri Trice, kinship development at Child Protective Services’ Waco office advocates Kinship Care first, to the benefit of the child…

Every parent facing off in court with Child Protective Services, in which no effort was made to place children with family members, should print and keep this article, which ran in the Waco Herald-Tribune, Monday, January 26, 2009

Terri Trice, who works in kinship development at Child Protective Services’ Waco office, said family members and close friends typically are looked to first when the agency must remove children from their home.

Any parents in Waco know differently? Is there really an agency that is following the law as it is written? Wouldn’t that be refreshing?

“It’s just a lot better for children if we can place them with a relative,” she said, citing less emotional trauma for the children, easier transition regarding cultures and religion, and placing less of a burden on foster facilities.

Print off the entire article and make it part of your evidence in court. What have you got to lose?

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