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Believe in your Miracle

November 14, 2011 in jail, justice

When the unthinkable happens, we have a tendency to wonder… “Why me, Lord?”

It is during these turbulent periods in our lives that we learn and grow, if we are paying attention. This is similar to how a marathon runner or a weight lifter must exercise daily, to build up strength and endurance, if they intend to come out a winner.

Just because you can’t see your way out of a situation, does not mean that you are in an impossible place, it simply means the solution hasn’t presented itself yet. If you continue to work toward your goals, pray and have an ounce of faith. We should all be inspired by Jackie Carpenter…

How Faith Made A Mother Take Her Bible Into Court Knowing She Would Rather Offend A Juror Than Offend God

The Bridge: Between Cell Block A and a Miracle in Psalm 91Ellaville, GA, November 14,  2011 – Jackie Carpenter describes herself as a businesswoman, volunteer and reluctant author because she never intended to become an author, nor expected to be a resource for people facing a crisis in life. But she took the worst crisis in her life and the miracle that stemmed from it and wove it into a dramatic and heart-wrenching story.

The Bridge: Between Cell Block A and a Miracle is Psalm 91 (Xulon Publishing) is the powerful and compelling story of the terrifying journey that began the morning she received a frantic call from her son’s wife telling her that he had been arrested for felony murder, and it did not end until the jury returned its verdict ten months later.

Jackie Carpenter was living the true American Dream. She had good health, a beautiful home, married to a wonderful man, and had two married sons and four grandchildren – she honestly believed life could not get any better.

It was then she discovered it could get a whole lot worse. The Bridge tells the frightening chain of events that occurred after her son, the victim of copper thefts on his construction job sites, was guarding his property on the advice of a deputy. In the early morning hours of June 27, 2008, he attempted a citizen’s arrest when his gun accidentally fired, wounding one of the alleged thieves. Hours later when the man died from the wound, the deputy recanted his advice and her son Jason was taken into custody and charged with felony murder and four other serious charges.

At a time when Jackie Carpenter’s world was turned upside down she did the one thing she knew how to do – she turned to God. It took ten long months, many visits to her prayer closet, and the help of Psalm 91 for the author to build her faith to the point where she believed God would perform a miracle. And on April 16, 2009 at 3:40 p.m. she got her miracle when her son went from being on Cell Block A (where murderers are housed) to freedom after the jury returned a verdict of “Not Guilty!”

While The Bridge is the story of her walk of faith, the sequel Georgia Justice: A Story To Faith, acts as a guide for building faith in the face of tragedy or grief and tells how a tormented mother made the critical decision that allowed God to deliver such a miracle. It is a powerful testimony to the spiritual strength this small-town girl found in the promises of Psalm 91 and how she built her faith up during the tormenting ten months leading up to her son’s trial.

When this Georgia mother made the fateful decision to carry her Bible into the courtroom, against the wishes of her son’s attorney who felt a non-believing juror could be offended and hold it against her son, she made a huge leap of faith by deciding she would rather offend a juror than offend God – she got her miracle in the form of an acquittal!

Jackie Carpenter has made numerous appearances on television, in radio interviews and in newspaper articles and her books will be produced into a motion picture that will be in theaters the fall of 2012. For more information on this author and her miraculous story of faith, hope and love that brought her to victory, please visit her website at: www.bridgetoamiracle.com.

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What the critics say?

Bob Etier, Blog Critics:  “The Bridge is a book for people who believe in miracles.  It is also for people who need to be reminded that during troubling times, God is not the guilty party. Even devout Christians sometimes need to be reminded that their strength is in the Lord, and The Bridge serves as that reminder.”

Emory Daniels, Book Reviews: “The Bridge clearly demonstrates that God still performs miracles in the 21st century.  A key point is that when bad things happen it’s better to trust God than to blame Him. The story also reveals that it is certainly possible to survive a tragedy without losing faith.”

Monique, Book Pleasures: “This is a good, inspirational story…you can absolutely see the conviction in her (Jackie’s) heart that God’s love and grace alone brought her through this difficult time…she simply wants to share her miracle with you.”

 

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DCFS and Rett Syndrome

October 4, 2011 in Adoption, Arkansas, corruption, DCFS, foster care, foster parents

Who will stand up and speak out against the power hungry DCFS workers in Little Rock, Arkansas? Even children with Rett Syndrome deserve parents! Why would the state prefer to warehouse children in an institution? It doesn’t make any sense. Read Jill’s story…

My daughter’s foster home closed this past week, due to some paperwork she had not turned in. I am by no means excusing this, as she has acknowledged she was in the wrong.

Official seal of City of Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock DCFS, Out of Control!

She and her husband were in the process of adopting three girls. The attorney for the 14 year old requested a hearing; the judge gave custody to my daughter and son in law. The judge said he was displeased with how DCFS had handled the case.

They removed the 4 year old from their home on Thursday; and placed her in an institution, located in North Little Rock. She suffers from Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism, and she is unable to speak. They removed the six year old on Friday morning, and placed her in another foster home.

My daughter was told she could not speak to, nor assist with the transition of the four year old. My daughter is the only one who has cared for this child in three and a half years. She has fought the state on numerous occasions to get the training needed to care for this child.

DCFS also failed the children. The 14 year old met with her caseworker once – six months ago – the day before a court hearing. The next day, in court, the caseworker did not know her name, age, or where she went to school. Caseworkers, by law, are required to visit children on a weekly basis — no one has been in the home to check on any of the children in six months.

When we were in court, the DCFS workers were sitting directly in front of us, they talked about my family, knowing we could hear every word they uttered. One made the comment that she had wanted to close this foster home since last November. However, they placed another child in the home just this past spring.

The agency has opposed the adoption of the four year old because of her disability. They say she is better off in an institution.

We love this little girl and do not feel she is a burden at all. My daughter and son in law asked to proceed with the adoption of the four and six year old. They even offered to waive any stipend the state would pay, but the state workers declined. Maybe it is the position of the state that all handicapped children should live in an institution?

I believe these children belong in a loving home with friends and family to call their own. What the state is doing is wrong.

Jill H.
Little Rock, Arkansas

Learn More About Rett Syndrome

WebMD Medical Reference

Rett syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. When boys develop the Rett syndrome mutation, they die shortly after birth.

What Are the Symptoms of Rett Syndrome?

Although it’s not always detected, a slowing of head growth is one of the first events in Rett syndrome. Loss of muscle tone is also an initial symptom. Soon, the little girl loses any purposeful use of her hands. Instead, she habitually wrings or rubs her hands together.

Around 1 to 4 years of age, social and language skills deteriorate in girls with Rett syndrome. A girl with Rett syndrome stops talking. She develops extreme social anxiety and withdrawal or disinterest in other people.

Rett syndrome also causes problems with muscles and coordination. Walking becomes awkward as girls develop a jerky, stiff-legged gait. A girl with Rett syndrome may also have uncoordinated breathing and seizures.

Treatments for Rett Syndrome

There are treatments available for Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome treatments focus on helping a girl live the best life she can with the condition. Physical therapy can help improve mobility in these children. Speech therapy may help somewhat with language problems. Occupational therapy helps girls perform daily activities — like bathing and dressing — independently.

Experts believe that therapy can help girls with Rett syndrome and their parents. Although a “normal” life may not be possible, some improvement can be expected with therapy. Participating in activities — including school — and improved social interaction are sometimes possible.

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Jury found man Innocent: Financial Ruin

September 9, 2011 in False Allegations, justice, lawsuit, Michigan

My friend called me today, she is having the best day she has had in over two years because today her husband was finally found not guilty in a criminal trial by his a jury of his peers.

Fortunately, my friend has a strong marriage and a strong support system. It’s a good thing too because the courts have put her and her husband through the wringer.

Her husband was falsely accused of sexual molestation of his grandchild and her older siblings. Oakland County, Michigan prosecutors decided to file charges a second time, when the jury was unable to return a verdict in the first trial. So, they were forced to start all over again and prepare for a second trial.

My friend has a heart of gold and has been there for these children and their mother, providing babysitting assistance, groceries, transportation and anything else that was needed. It breaks my heart to know what she has endured as a thank you for her kindness.

During the second trial, one of the children claimed she was molested everytime she visited their house. One of the other children admitted that she had lied on the stand during the first trial. The mother was caught in several lies. After the second trial, the jury explained that the expert witness was what had convinced them. Well, for $25,000 — I would hope so.

Who has that kind of money to spend? Fortunately, this couple were able to come up with the resources to fight these false allegations, but what if they didnt?

In the end, it doesn’t matter one bit that the allegations were nothing more than lies and that this generous, loving couple is out more than $100,000 in court expenses, lawyer fees, expert witness expenses, etc… They can’t claim any of the expense on their income taxes, they can’t sue the mother, she lives on welfare benefits, the children are in foster care. The lawyer says they can’t sue the state to recoop the damages. The state is exempt from prosecution. They are just out the money and fortunate to still have a home to live in.

These false allegations cost her over $25,000 from her personal business – who wants to do business with a child molester? Where does a family go for relief? There is something very wrong with a court system that doesn’t provide any relief for people who have been wrongly accused. How can anyone expect justice?

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