You are browsing the archive for justice | My.Kidjacked.com.

Parental Responsibility

November 6, 2011 in Alaska, family rights, justice, parental rights, termination of parental rights, TPR, Visitation

Just exactly what rights and responsibilities do parents have to a child? We all know the laws concerning child support, child custody and visitation are unfair and unjust but still they persist.

Just today found on Lawyers.com was an interesting question:

To Terminate Fathers Rights, Or Not Too?

A military man and his wife of 4-years took the ex-wife to court for the military man to claim his parental rights to the child, because he has been paying $491 a month in child support, but has never had the opportunity to see his child. He has two other children in the home and he is serving his country in Afghanistan. [Continue Reading]

Rights?

Speak Out Against Injustice!

You would think an issue like this would be rare, but it happens all the time. Some cases are so egregious that it can make you crazy. For instance, I know of one man in his mid-30’s, he has 3 children by two different women. His first child was born to a wife of 10-years, he was ordered to pay over $700.00 a month in child support.

His two subsequent children were born of his relationship with his live-in girl-friend of several years. When they split the court ordered the father to pay $25 a month (for both children).

You simply can’t support 2 children on $25 a month, even if you assume both parents split the cost.

Instead, why don’t they use a regional formula, sort of like the ones they use to distribute welfare benefits and food stamps. The county office needs to figure out the average cost of caring for a child in their county and allocate half to each parent. Why should some children live very comfortably, when other children barely have food to eat?

There simply has to be a better way. A way that helps ensure the needs of the children are being met.

Please post your comments below and at the link above.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Jury found man Innocent: Financial Ruin

September 9, 2011 in False Allegations, justice, lawsuit, Michigan

My friend called me today, she is having the best day she has had in over two years because today her husband was finally found not guilty in a criminal trial by his a jury of his peers.

Fortunately, my friend has a strong marriage and a strong support system. It’s a good thing too because the courts have put her and her husband through the wringer.

Her husband was falsely accused of sexual molestation of his grandchild and her older siblings. Oakland County, Michigan prosecutors decided to file charges a second time, when the jury was unable to return a verdict in the first trial. So, they were forced to start all over again and prepare for a second trial.

My friend has a heart of gold and has been there for these children and their mother, providing babysitting assistance, groceries, transportation and anything else that was needed. It breaks my heart to know what she has endured as a thank you for her kindness.

During the second trial, one of the children claimed she was molested everytime she visited their house. One of the other children admitted that she had lied on the stand during the first trial. The mother was caught in several lies. After the second trial, the jury explained that the expert witness was what had convinced them. Well, for $25,000 — I would hope so.

Who has that kind of money to spend? Fortunately, this couple were able to come up with the resources to fight these false allegations, but what if they didnt?

In the end, it doesn’t matter one bit that the allegations were nothing more than lies and that this generous, loving couple is out more than $100,000 in court expenses, lawyer fees, expert witness expenses, etc… They can’t claim any of the expense on their income taxes, they can’t sue the mother, she lives on welfare benefits, the children are in foster care. The lawyer says they can’t sue the state to recoop the damages. The state is exempt from prosecution. They are just out the money and fortunate to still have a home to live in.

These false allegations cost her over $25,000 from her personal business – who wants to do business with a child molester? Where does a family go for relief? There is something very wrong with a court system that doesn’t provide any relief for people who have been wrongly accused. How can anyone expect justice?

How to Attract Media Attention!

July 6, 2011 in biological parents, corruption, due process, Event, family rights, justice, Kidjacked, parental rights

US Navy 030322-N-6477M-003 Local residents tak...

This Navy man has the right idea!

I wasn’t too sure starting a Kidjacked Facebook page was going to be a good idea but it’s been working incredibly well. People are asking questions and interacting to share valuable information, they are organizing state and local groups.

Just today a good question was asked on Facebook

How do you go about getting the media involved or filing a lawsuit?

Please someone help me I have been fighting to get my daughter back for over three years. No allegations of abuse or neglect – I simply left my daughter with my husband and they told him they could take her on the basis that we were married after she was born and he didn’t have proof of paternity on him.

We are still in a suspended TPR/reunification after taking their ‘deals’ of not going to trial earlier with the promise she would come home 2 years ago.  I need my daughter home!  The potential adoptive mother met her in her daycare.  Isn’t that illegal, if she wasn’t a foster/adoptive home beforehand, and isn’t related to her?  That is a law I know for sure in some states.

Please help me they lie and lie and lie to me and refuse to let her come home, when they are the ones preventing her from coming home, there has never been one safety issue whatsoever.

Several responses were offered up for the desperate mother. I offered up my own response to address a portion of her question, “How do you go about getting the media involved?”

  1. Write a concise article, detailing the facts.
  2. Have a trusted well-educated friend or acquaintance proof read it for grammar & spelling.
  3. Write a press release – paying attention to length.
  4. Write a brief introduction and collect names, email addresses and phone numbers of media people. Be sure to check for recent articles on the topic and contact a reporter who is interested in these type of “human interest” type stories.
  5. Then just keep at it. Once you have good copy and a good list, it’s simply a matter of numbers.
  6. Then post your story to your own blog at my.kidjacked.com and share your blog with the world. I’m happy to feature any well-written blog on Kidjacked home page and the news sections.
  7. You can’t skip any of these steps if you wish to have the best chances of success. We have resources within the CPS reform community, to help make your story a headline but we must be smart about it.

The system only works as well as it does by making us feel isolated and alone. The powers that be (CPS, Family Court, etc…) like to keep us fighting an uphill battle for as long as they can. Some people get angry and refuse to cooperate, often only making matters worse for themselves and their children. Once you begin to recover your strength (after their one-two punch) and begin to work your case, you should begin to look for support.

United we stand, divided we fall. We can’t stand alone, we must have a strong support community and that is exactly what we need to build.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Demand Return of Parental Rights

June 17, 2011 in Child Protective Services, corruption, justice, parental rights

Father’s Day is this Sunday. We know that Mother’s Day is really rough for those with children living in foster homes. Let’s not forget that Father’s grief the loss of their children too. Please join me in praying that this father finds answers and is reunified with his child.

Choosing The Right Key

Choosing The Right

I am a good father of 6-year-old twins (a boy & a girl) and stepfather of an 8-year-old girl. I want to withdraw my consent to services and even my submission in our juvenile dependency case. Between the kids mother and myself we were both coerced, threatened, and tricked into assigning our signatures to consent forms, submissions and services. Our six month review hearing approaches.

I am convinced that fraud, deceit, lies, deception, and unfair law practices are at work and I know that I am be led to slaughter by the system. How do I withdraw? I know I wont participate any longer, knowing that service is submission. What steps can I take on August 6th, to insist that the courts return my parental rights?

M.D.,
Father-at-large

Enhanced by Zemanta

It’s Your Move!

February 8, 2010 in justice, parental rights, termination of parental rights

Almost nightly, news reports are replete with details regarding dead and injured children at the hands of their capturers, it doesn’t seem to matter which side of the fence you sit.

If the parents are poor, struggling in these harsh economic times, it’s more than likely the parents are ill educated and either doing or dealing drugs. Most get started because the rent still has to be paid and the kids still have to eat. The children have been exposed to drugs, harmful chemicals and dumb ass attacks from parents too stoned out of their minds to care.

Welfare workers do not want these children. Grandparents can call Child Protective Services ’til the cows come home. Those kids aren’t going anywhere, unless there is a catastrophe. If a child is not badly burned, disfigured or murdered — a case that makes the news, in many instances, those kids are going nowhere. It costs the state money to take on these cases.

It's Your Move!

State-financed child welfare departments choose instead to round up the children of parents who are on the upper rung of the lower class and creeping slowly into the middle class.

You see, if they can find (or in some cases, create) something to charge you with, state child welfare investigators will remove your children from your home (for their own well-being, of course) and thus begin the process, where you spend every dime you have, jumping through hoops, mandated by child protection workers.

There are a great many jobs dependent on our children. Every person in the courtroom, including the judge, owes their job to the children of accused (not convicted, just accused) parents. The judge, the bailiff, the court reporter, the caseworkers, counselors, foster parent, service workers, medical doctors, and the list goes on.

The old adage, "He who pays the piper, calls the tune," certainly applies here. The state pays for services (with a huge donation from the federal government) — most low to middle class parents can’t afford to hire an attorney, so they rely on the state to provide for their defense. These attorney’s work everyday with these same people. They eat lunch together, share funny e-mails, they might even go out after work together for cocktails. The only one left out of the loop is you and your son or daughter.

The only way I see to combat current trends in a meaningful way, is for the children who were wrongfully removed from loving, caring parents to sue the state for damages. Of course the last thing on an 18 year olds’ mind is a protracted court battle and attorney visits.

In most states, young adults have the right to bring suit for damages, against the perpetrators for injustices, which have occured to them, as juveniles — in many states for up to five years from the time the child has turned 18.

Have you, or do you know someone who was harmed by our family court system? We need to encourage these young people to seek out pro bono independent legal representation.

Young men and women have lost touch with their natural born parents. They have lost their right to inherit from their parents and their chance to know their own family history. In short, millions of children are being robbed of their family heritage — a God given right.

I am pleased to post your stories here as well. Please check out the posting guidelines.

css.php
Skip to toolbar