You are browsing the archive for foster care | My.Kidjacked.com.

MO: Kids Rejoin Foster Care

March 8, 2013 in foster care, Missouri

Sun Village - charity for the children of pris...

Sun Village – charity for the children of prisoners

This makes absolutely no sense to me.

Missouri senators pass bill allowing kids to rejoin foster care

JEFFERSON CITY — Children leaving the foster care system after their 18th birthday would be able to return to state custody under a bill passed Thursday by the Missouri Senate.

Current law allows children to remain in the foster care system until they are 21, but it prevents re-entry if they leave after turning 18.

Why would they put kids who have been out in the street BACK in foster care?  You put them to work.  Heck some sort of assisted living, teach them how to make it on their own, you don’t treat them like children for crying out loud.

Are the children growing up today really that immature?  What have we done to our children that they can’t take care of themselves?  It just seems to me that the foster care system had, whatever time the child was there to prepare that child for the world.  They have to do more.  We are breeding dependence.

It has only been in the past 100 years or so, children were setting up house and getting married at 13.  Could you imagine ANY child you know, at the age of 13 being capable of holding a job, supporting a family, running a household.  I’m hard pressed to think of ONE.

Something to thing about.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Parenting a Liar…

November 1, 2011 in foster care, foster parents, Kidjacked, parent-child relationship

Do you have a child who lies for no apparent reason? You aren’t alone and you could be a big part of the problem, which means you can help.

A woman typing on a laptop

Foster kids need computers too

Before you get all indignant, please understand, I believe some children have what I think of, as a “lying gene,” and lying simply comes natural to these children. Children who have been moved around from foster care home to foster care home, will often take on a new identity, when they realize they are living with complete strangers and can become anyone they wish. In these cases, lying becomes a way of life.

These foster children are the ones the system likes to label as RAD (Reactive Attachment Disorder) children. Children in foster care soon learn to keep people at a distance and will have trust issues. Who can blame them? You can’t wear your heart on your sleeve without having it repeatedly broken by a heartless uncaring system, where the individual gets chewed up in the grinding of the system.

I can remember carrying everything I own in a paper bag. I’m certain many foster care children are thrilled to receive suitcases from churches, schools and other charitable organizations that have donation drives for foster kids. It would be wonderful if more could be done for these children. It’s too bad most foster care children never receive the benefits of things done in their name — such as donations for laptops.

Just how long do you think a child alone, left to the mercy of the system, will be able to keep a $1,000 laptop — or even a $250 notebook? If they aren’t stolen by a foster family member or foster parent, the temptation to sell it for cash or even drugs (if they are an issue) is great.

Getting back to the child with the imaginary “lying gene”

Learning how to better approach the child, can drastically increase his or her truth-telling. If you have one child, this is much easier, because you know who “did it,” you don’t have to play investigator. So, insteading of asking the child, “Who left the toilet seat up?” You simply say, “Please don’t leave the seat up on the toilet.”

As parents of a child with lying issues, it’s easy to get into the bad habit of asking questions that we already know the answers to. When we learn to rephrase our questions, or avoid asking a question all-together, we can help avoid the temptation to lie.  Often with a little thought and an attitude change, you can help your child feel better about his or herself and break the cycle of lying.

It is up to the parent to demonstrate good moral fortitude. Be sure your child hears you being honest. Take the time to continually express the importance on honestly. The Bible can serve as a useful tool in training your child in honesty. Ask your child to read, memorize, copy and recite from this list of scripture verses on honesty.

You can choose to tolerate your child’s lying, which can and often will continue as a pattern into adulthood or you can choose to change your parenting style and address the issue — the earlier the better. If you have a child who is constantly lying, don’t give up — get help.

 [Download: Bible Lesson on Truth and Lies (pdf)]

Click Here to Stop the Yelling • Lecturing • Scolding Pushing and Prodding
and Start Getting The Results You Want

Teaching Honesty to our Children

Enhanced by Zemanta

DCFS and Rett Syndrome

October 4, 2011 in Adoption, Arkansas, corruption, DCFS, foster care, foster parents

Who will stand up and speak out against the power hungry DCFS workers in Little Rock, Arkansas? Even children with Rett Syndrome deserve parents! Why would the state prefer to warehouse children in an institution? It doesn’t make any sense. Read Jill’s story…

My daughter’s foster home closed this past week, due to some paperwork she had not turned in. I am by no means excusing this, as she has acknowledged she was in the wrong.

Official seal of City of Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock DCFS, Out of Control!

She and her husband were in the process of adopting three girls. The attorney for the 14 year old requested a hearing; the judge gave custody to my daughter and son in law. The judge said he was displeased with how DCFS had handled the case.

They removed the 4 year old from their home on Thursday; and placed her in an institution, located in North Little Rock. She suffers from Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism, and she is unable to speak. They removed the six year old on Friday morning, and placed her in another foster home.

My daughter was told she could not speak to, nor assist with the transition of the four year old. My daughter is the only one who has cared for this child in three and a half years. She has fought the state on numerous occasions to get the training needed to care for this child.

DCFS also failed the children. The 14 year old met with her caseworker once – six months ago – the day before a court hearing. The next day, in court, the caseworker did not know her name, age, or where she went to school. Caseworkers, by law, are required to visit children on a weekly basis — no one has been in the home to check on any of the children in six months.

When we were in court, the DCFS workers were sitting directly in front of us, they talked about my family, knowing we could hear every word they uttered. One made the comment that she had wanted to close this foster home since last November. However, they placed another child in the home just this past spring.

The agency has opposed the adoption of the four year old because of her disability. They say she is better off in an institution.

We love this little girl and do not feel she is a burden at all. My daughter and son in law asked to proceed with the adoption of the four and six year old. They even offered to waive any stipend the state would pay, but the state workers declined. Maybe it is the position of the state that all handicapped children should live in an institution?

I believe these children belong in a loving home with friends and family to call their own. What the state is doing is wrong.

Jill H.
Little Rock, Arkansas

Learn More About Rett Syndrome

WebMD Medical Reference

Rett syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. When boys develop the Rett syndrome mutation, they die shortly after birth.

What Are the Symptoms of Rett Syndrome?

Although it’s not always detected, a slowing of head growth is one of the first events in Rett syndrome. Loss of muscle tone is also an initial symptom. Soon, the little girl loses any purposeful use of her hands. Instead, she habitually wrings or rubs her hands together.

Around 1 to 4 years of age, social and language skills deteriorate in girls with Rett syndrome. A girl with Rett syndrome stops talking. She develops extreme social anxiety and withdrawal or disinterest in other people.

Rett syndrome also causes problems with muscles and coordination. Walking becomes awkward as girls develop a jerky, stiff-legged gait. A girl with Rett syndrome may also have uncoordinated breathing and seizures.

Treatments for Rett Syndrome

There are treatments available for Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome treatments focus on helping a girl live the best life she can with the condition. Physical therapy can help improve mobility in these children. Speech therapy may help somewhat with language problems. Occupational therapy helps girls perform daily activities — like bathing and dressing — independently.

Experts believe that therapy can help girls with Rett syndrome and their parents. Although a “normal” life may not be possible, some improvement can be expected with therapy. Participating in activities — including school — and improved social interaction are sometimes possible.

Enhanced by Zemanta

White Children Targeted

September 30, 2011 in Adoption, California, corruption, CPS, family court, family rights, foster care

In June 2011, Sarah Sandy’s children were removed by Orange County Child Protective Services. She fought her battle for their return, in the family court of Orange County, California, where corruption appears to be the order of the day. You decide. Watch the video…

White Children being Targeted for Abduction By CPS

Jeanne Gelin, with the National Coalition for Child Protection Reform (NCCPR) comments on the court proceedings. Gelin addresses the ethnic disparity issue. [Visit: NCCPR]

“Statistics show that almost 80% of children placed in foster care, should never have been removed from their homes. There was never any abuse.”

What do you think? Do you believe that CPS targets white children for removal?

May is National Foster Care Month!

May 29, 2010 in family court, foster care

As most of us are well aware, May has been declared National Foster Care Month. Yes, I realize I am getting this out a little late. Grandma always said, “Better late than never.” Actually, I don’t want to celebrate foster care month, not this May or next or any other month for that matter.

May is National Foster Care Month

The news has been full of heart touching foster care children, parents and facilities. As a previous foster child all I hear is that yet another family failed. Foster care can be a death sentence for many children. Hardly a day goes by that we don’t hear of another foster child’s death.

There are very few families who don’t have someone who is willing to care for the children who have been deemed “child in need of care” by some authority or another. I simply can’t understand our closed court system that is rampant in the U.S. Any person who has a personal interest in the child in question should be welcomed by the court to speak on behalf of the child. To deny a child the right to have an advocate, a family member or person who gives a damn about the outcome of the hearing, is wrong on so many levels.

I would like to invite current or previous wards of the state — living in foster care — to create their own blog. Please share your personal story. Let your voice be heard. Were you treated fairly? Do you think you are better off now or were you wrongly removed from your home in your eyes?

June is an election month. If you know of a candidate who supports CPS reforms, please share here and on our Facebook page. We need to hear from your candidate.

css.php
Skip to toolbar