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Arizona Mom Needs Attorney

January 20, 2012 in Arizona, biological parents, family court, family rights

Hi. I need help. I was hoping that you would have some reputable attorneys who fight cps in the Phoenix Arizona area?

It’s been a year since I have seen my little boy who will be 7 years old next month. CPS took him away from me on July 4, 2009.

For a year in a half I did everything that CPS demanded of me. I took parenting classes, anger management classes, mental health classes. My visitations with my son went from 2 hours twice a week to 1 hour once a week.

My son is diagnosed with MMR, ADHD & ODD. He was placed in foster care but only until an adoptive placement took place. I have found out many of times the foster care family neglected my son’s health. When I notified my CPS case manager they didn’t do anything.

I am all alone with no family support. I don’t feel like I can trust just anybody anymore due to the fact I trusted my state and they conspired against us (my son and I).

I can’t sleep. I can’t eat. I think of my son every second of every day. I feel guilty because I allowed the state into our lives because I had nothing to hide and they straight up lied about me. I am a good mom. My son is my world!

When I did have supervised visits, my son never wanted to go back to his foster parents. He always wanted to come home with me. The psychologist hired by CPS said to the court that my son doesn’t think of me as an authoritive parent but just a playmate because I only wanted to make the hour I had with my son happy.

I feel like I have a strong case against CPS but I cannot afford an expensive attorney. Can you please help me find an attorney who will listen to my story and help me. I feel so alone.  My son is in a group home now. I am frightened for my son to be all alone in this big scary world at the tender age of 7 years old. I just want to protect him and give him the same opportunity every child has at becoming an successful, honest adult. I want him to know that I love him and will never give up on him.

I don’t use drugs and I have never been in trouble with the law before CPS wrongfully accused me of child abuse neglect.

Please, please help me.

Sent from my LG phone

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Is Our Society Prejudiced Against Children?

January 10, 2012 in child abuse, family rights, parent-child relationship

We have to begin to address the root of the problem. I think a lot of these so called new diagnoses are nothing more than environmental responses. Our children are being experimented on. From the GMO (genetically modified organisms) cereal in their breakfast bowl to the innocent looking vaccines they tell us are good for us.

Is Our Society Prejudiced Against Children?

Young-Breuhl, an analyst, political theorist and biographer, calls attention to the way human rights of children are threatened. Childism is defined as “a prejudice against children on the ground of a belief that they are property and can (or even should) be controlled, enslaved, or removed to serve adult needs.”

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Elena’s story offers a microscopic view of the macroscopic phenomenon Young-Breuhl so brilliantly articulates. Following the history of the field of Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) studies, she finds that “from the start [this field] took attention away from abusers and their motivations; and it implied that children could be helped without their abusers being helped.”

Furthermore, she describes Child Protective Services (CPS) as a “rescue service-a child saving service-not a family service supporting child development generally and helping parents…” Rather than setting up a system of treatment, CPS became “an investigative service…a situation in which bad families suspected of making their children bad will be invaded and infiltrated.”

Young- Breuhl has empathy for both parent and child, arguing that failure to support families is a manifestation of childism.

Can the children all be helped? No, but we must do the right thing. Frankly, some parents should just walk away. They should never have become parents in the first place. But the reality is that children are being removed from perfectly good parents, parents who are struggling either emotionally, physically, or financially.

These are issues best served locally. They cannot be addresses federally because each area will have its own issues and they will vary from community to community. I am pleased that someone else recognized these inherent problems with a top-down, one-size-fits-all approach.

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Big Medicine and the Family Courts

November 20, 2011 in family court, family rights, justice, Maryland, medication

If you are dealing with the medical community and the family courts, this book is a must read. Readers describe the book as interesting, tragic, funny, compelling, amazing, and more. If you think you have problems, please know that you are not alone.

The Good, The Bad, and The Crazy:
(No One’s Ever Called Me Boring)

The Book Big Medicine And Family Court Does NOT Want You Reading

The Good, the Bad, and the CRAZY: (No One's Ever Called Me Boring)The Good, The Bad, and The Crazy: No One’s Ever Called Me Boring (Duke, M.D. Literary Enterprises, L.L.C.) by Mary Ann Duke, M.D., is the true story of a modern-day Joan of Arc who survived being burned at the stake by the male-dominated medical and judicial systems, and now dares to tell the unrevealed truth.

Mary Ann Duke was the epitome of a success story. She graduated from medical school at age twenty-three and became a board-certified ophthalmologist by age thirty. Her private practice in the prestigious suburb of Potomac, Maryland had a patient list that read like a Who’s Who of the Washington Metropolitan Social Register. Dr. Duke was granted privileges at the renowned John Hopkins’ Wilmer Eye Institute. Happily married, she lived in a gorgeous home with her husband and their three beautiful children.

That is, until the day she found her husband and best friend together and her perfect world exploded, sinking her into a pit of despair. This was the beginning of the end for Mary Ann Duke; the God-fearing, small town girl from upstate New York. She began drinking to ease her pain, and the alcohol, along with an untreated bipolar disorder, soon cost her everything…

The Good, The Bad, and The Crazy is packed with life lessons that come together in a mixture of spirit and guts, new-found wisdom and touching sorrow. This writer’s sharp wit and glorious sense of humor (especially when she describes being in jail with an alleged killer) makes her book a page-turner that is impossible to put down!

The Good, The Bad, and The Crazy not only chronicles the myriad challenges and prejudices a brilliant, young female doctor faces from both the medical and legal systems, but it also tells the very personal and moving story of her downward spiral into alcoholism; her private war with bipolar disorder; her fight for custody of her children, and the pain of incarceration. Yet the sheer determination and perseverance of this writer incites readers to cheer for her tenacious spirit that has proven no matter what the odds – she will never give up.

Dr. Mary Ann Duke’s electrifying book challenges the status quo and shamelessly avenges her honor. It is a story of social protest that will be read and revered for generations to come. The final pages of The Good, The Bad, and The Crazy are scanned medical and legal documents that prove the truth of her writing.

The Amazon description calls the book a blockbuster…

A blockbuster in the secret world of sexual discrimination. “The Good, The Bad, and THE CRAZY” is a riveting true story of a young woman trying to fulfill her childhood dreams of career and family, to be repeatedly gunned down by the medical and judicial systems. The author candidly writes of her joys and successes and also her divorce, despair into alcoholism, custody wars and even jail time, with guts and humor.

Dr. Mary Ann Duke’s perseverance is an inspiration to any one who has faced adversity or prejudice, and her amazing story is proven in a unique “Documentation” section.

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Parental Responsibility

November 6, 2011 in Alaska, family rights, justice, parental rights, termination of parental rights, TPR, Visitation

Just exactly what rights and responsibilities do parents have to a child? We all know the laws concerning child support, child custody and visitation are unfair and unjust but still they persist.

Just today found on Lawyers.com was an interesting question:

To Terminate Fathers Rights, Or Not Too?

A military man and his wife of 4-years took the ex-wife to court for the military man to claim his parental rights to the child, because he has been paying $491 a month in child support, but has never had the opportunity to see his child. He has two other children in the home and he is serving his country in Afghanistan. [Continue Reading]

Rights?

Speak Out Against Injustice!

You would think an issue like this would be rare, but it happens all the time. Some cases are so egregious that it can make you crazy. For instance, I know of one man in his mid-30’s, he has 3 children by two different women. His first child was born to a wife of 10-years, he was ordered to pay over $700.00 a month in child support.

His two subsequent children were born of his relationship with his live-in girl-friend of several years. When they split the court ordered the father to pay $25 a month (for both children).

You simply can’t support 2 children on $25 a month, even if you assume both parents split the cost.

Instead, why don’t they use a regional formula, sort of like the ones they use to distribute welfare benefits and food stamps. The county office needs to figure out the average cost of caring for a child in their county and allocate half to each parent. Why should some children live very comfortably, when other children barely have food to eat?

There simply has to be a better way. A way that helps ensure the needs of the children are being met.

Please post your comments below and at the link above.

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Kinship care vs Fostering

October 15, 2011 in California, DCF, DCFS, DHS, family rights, foster parents, grandparents rights, Idaho, Michigan

I’ve had several people in the past few weeks tell me that they wish to care for their own family members – as opposed to having them placed in foster care, with strangers. These grandparents, aunts, uncles and other close relatives are being told they must become certified foster parents.

Advocating for Children in Foster and Kinship Care: A Guide to Getting the Best out of the System for Caregivers and Practitioners Federal law requires that state social workers attempt to find suitable placement for “at risk” children, who are removed from their home. In many cases the state is merely paying lip-service and doesn’t actually follow the law.

This is a violation of federal law and the state can lose their federal funding. You should always report such violations of federal law to your U.S. House Representation. Call and request an investigation. You will need to provide them with a legal release form, along with the facts and any supporting documents.

Just today the Idaho Press-Tribune ran an interesting article:

In Idaho, more grandparents still in parental role

Many grandparents who take in grandchildren qualify for a $300 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families grant. The amount is the same regardless of the number of children in a family.

Grandparents also can become certified as foster parents, and take in their own grandchildren through the state system. That means more financial support. Monthly foster payments per child in Idaho range from $274 to $431 based on age; payments increase if children have special needs. Foster children get Medicaid cards and other benefits.

But many families don’t want to do that, Perry said. Some bristle at the idea of giving the state that much control over their families, even temporarily.

“They feel taking care of their own family is their responsibility,” he said.

Tracee Crawford, one of the leaders of the Grandparents as Parents of the Treasure Valley, a Southwest Idaho support group, said grandparents sometimes hesitate to ask for help of any kind, afraid that if they make trouble, their children will take the grandchildren away.

Becoming a legal guardian, another option, comes with its own complications, including steep legal costs, said Crawford.

She became part of a kin-care family when her daughter had cancer. Crawford cared for her and her grandson until her daughter died. She’s been in long legal battles with her former son-in-law over visitation rights with her grandson.

“To become a legal guardian, you have to prove a parent — your child — is unfit,” she said. “That’s really hard to do” — factually and emotionally.

Each state is different, which makes it difficult to know exactly what the law is your own state.

In my own case, I was shocked to find that while I was getting monthly kinship care checks from the State of California of ($357 – back in 2002), at the same time, another relative had a sibling to my grandson. The only difference was that they lived in Michigan; her checks from the State of Michigan – $123.  I felt bad for her because this child has autism and even in Michigan $123. doesn’t go far.

Be sure you check into your own states law, make a few phone calls, talk to an attorney and check out a few state websites before you sign anything. The choice you make could make a big difference in just how much help you are entitled to.

On that note, let me just remind you that if you accept money from the state, you accept all the strings that go along with that money, but it’s better than starving — maybe. We didn’t like giving up so much of our privacy, so we stopped received state funds many years ago – as soon as we could stand on our own two feet.

Knowledge is Power! Exercise your brain.

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