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CA to audit CPS…

June 6, 2013 in California, Child Protective Services, corruption, DCFS, Kidjacked

I was so happy to learn that California lawmakers have voted to order a long overdue audit of Child Protective Services.

We have a baby...for awhile at least

We have a baby…for awhile at least!

Child Protective Services is supposed to help children and families overcome stressful events in life, and stay together and healthy. But there are families who say that CPS does anything but that.

Family members testified before the legislative hearing that CPS actually has worked to destroy, not restore, their families. And others suggested there was a profit motive in the situation.

Parents around the state have had to deal with horrendous actions of CPS, like the Donnelly family.

One officer can be heard saying, “I’m going to grab your baby, and don’t resist, and don’t fight me, okay?”

Donnelly said he felt compelled to act, as a father, and as a legislator.

“The footage is frightening for parents everywhere to think that your children might be confiscated should CPS disagree with your parental instincts. It’s chilling to think that a government agency can take your child right back to a hospital that you as a parent have lost faith in, but it happened.”

Donnelly began demanding answers. In a letter, he asked Sheri Heller, director of California’s Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees CPS, to account for how this was allowed to happen.

Heller responded that she couldn’t share that information with an assemblyman, unless a judge ordered her to do so. Donnelly responded, “It has become clear that CPS answers to no one, but this abuse of power cannot be tolerated.”

You can read the rest of the story at: Child ‘Protectors’ Accused of Destroying Families

Was it just a coincidence that I received a letter only yesterday demanding someone investigate the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services?

Department of Children and Family Services, Los Angeles County is "Shawshank"

Department of Children and Family Services, Los Angeles County is “Shawshank”

I am glad they are finally getting the investigation they need, maybe we’ll actually get some justice.

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Kinship care vs Fostering

October 15, 2011 in California, DCF, DCFS, DHS, family rights, foster parents, grandparents rights, Idaho, Michigan

I’ve had several people in the past few weeks tell me that they wish to care for their own family members – as opposed to having them placed in foster care, with strangers. These grandparents, aunts, uncles and other close relatives are being told they must become certified foster parents.

Advocating for Children in Foster and Kinship Care: A Guide to Getting the Best out of the System for Caregivers and Practitioners Federal law requires that state social workers attempt to find suitable placement for “at risk” children, who are removed from their home. In many cases the state is merely paying lip-service and doesn’t actually follow the law.

This is a violation of federal law and the state can lose their federal funding. You should always report such violations of federal law to your U.S. House Representation. Call and request an investigation. You will need to provide them with a legal release form, along with the facts and any supporting documents.

Just today the Idaho Press-Tribune ran an interesting article:

In Idaho, more grandparents still in parental role

Many grandparents who take in grandchildren qualify for a $300 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families grant. The amount is the same regardless of the number of children in a family.

Grandparents also can become certified as foster parents, and take in their own grandchildren through the state system. That means more financial support. Monthly foster payments per child in Idaho range from $274 to $431 based on age; payments increase if children have special needs. Foster children get Medicaid cards and other benefits.

But many families don’t want to do that, Perry said. Some bristle at the idea of giving the state that much control over their families, even temporarily.

“They feel taking care of their own family is their responsibility,” he said.

Tracee Crawford, one of the leaders of the Grandparents as Parents of the Treasure Valley, a Southwest Idaho support group, said grandparents sometimes hesitate to ask for help of any kind, afraid that if they make trouble, their children will take the grandchildren away.

Becoming a legal guardian, another option, comes with its own complications, including steep legal costs, said Crawford.

She became part of a kin-care family when her daughter had cancer. Crawford cared for her and her grandson until her daughter died. She’s been in long legal battles with her former son-in-law over visitation rights with her grandson.

“To become a legal guardian, you have to prove a parent — your child — is unfit,” she said. “That’s really hard to do” — factually and emotionally.

Each state is different, which makes it difficult to know exactly what the law is your own state.

In my own case, I was shocked to find that while I was getting monthly kinship care checks from the State of California of ($357 – back in 2002), at the same time, another relative had a sibling to my grandson. The only difference was that they lived in Michigan; her checks from the State of Michigan – $123.  I felt bad for her because this child has autism and even in Michigan $123. doesn’t go far.

Be sure you check into your own states law, make a few phone calls, talk to an attorney and check out a few state websites before you sign anything. The choice you make could make a big difference in just how much help you are entitled to.

On that note, let me just remind you that if you accept money from the state, you accept all the strings that go along with that money, but it’s better than starving — maybe. We didn’t like giving up so much of our privacy, so we stopped received state funds many years ago – as soon as we could stand on our own two feet.

Knowledge is Power! Exercise your brain.

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DCFS and Rett Syndrome

October 4, 2011 in Adoption, Arkansas, corruption, DCFS, foster care, foster parents

Who will stand up and speak out against the power hungry DCFS workers in Little Rock, Arkansas? Even children with Rett Syndrome deserve parents! Why would the state prefer to warehouse children in an institution? It doesn’t make any sense. Read Jill’s story…

My daughter’s foster home closed this past week, due to some paperwork she had not turned in. I am by no means excusing this, as she has acknowledged she was in the wrong.

Official seal of City of Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock DCFS, Out of Control!

She and her husband were in the process of adopting three girls. The attorney for the 14 year old requested a hearing; the judge gave custody to my daughter and son in law. The judge said he was displeased with how DCFS had handled the case.

They removed the 4 year old from their home on Thursday; and placed her in an institution, located in North Little Rock. She suffers from Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism, and she is unable to speak. They removed the six year old on Friday morning, and placed her in another foster home.

My daughter was told she could not speak to, nor assist with the transition of the four year old. My daughter is the only one who has cared for this child in three and a half years. She has fought the state on numerous occasions to get the training needed to care for this child.

DCFS also failed the children. The 14 year old met with her caseworker once – six months ago – the day before a court hearing. The next day, in court, the caseworker did not know her name, age, or where she went to school. Caseworkers, by law, are required to visit children on a weekly basis — no one has been in the home to check on any of the children in six months.

When we were in court, the DCFS workers were sitting directly in front of us, they talked about my family, knowing we could hear every word they uttered. One made the comment that she had wanted to close this foster home since last November. However, they placed another child in the home just this past spring.

The agency has opposed the adoption of the four year old because of her disability. They say she is better off in an institution.

We love this little girl and do not feel she is a burden at all. My daughter and son in law asked to proceed with the adoption of the four and six year old. They even offered to waive any stipend the state would pay, but the state workers declined. Maybe it is the position of the state that all handicapped children should live in an institution?

I believe these children belong in a loving home with friends and family to call their own. What the state is doing is wrong.

Jill H.
Little Rock, Arkansas

Learn More About Rett Syndrome

WebMD Medical Reference

Rett syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. When boys develop the Rett syndrome mutation, they die shortly after birth.

What Are the Symptoms of Rett Syndrome?

Although it’s not always detected, a slowing of head growth is one of the first events in Rett syndrome. Loss of muscle tone is also an initial symptom. Soon, the little girl loses any purposeful use of her hands. Instead, she habitually wrings or rubs her hands together.

Around 1 to 4 years of age, social and language skills deteriorate in girls with Rett syndrome. A girl with Rett syndrome stops talking. She develops extreme social anxiety and withdrawal or disinterest in other people.

Rett syndrome also causes problems with muscles and coordination. Walking becomes awkward as girls develop a jerky, stiff-legged gait. A girl with Rett syndrome may also have uncoordinated breathing and seizures.

Treatments for Rett Syndrome

There are treatments available for Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome treatments focus on helping a girl live the best life she can with the condition. Physical therapy can help improve mobility in these children. Speech therapy may help somewhat with language problems. Occupational therapy helps girls perform daily activities — like bathing and dressing — independently.

Experts believe that therapy can help girls with Rett syndrome and their parents. Although a “normal” life may not be possible, some improvement can be expected with therapy. Participating in activities — including school — and improved social interaction are sometimes possible.

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Saving Isaiah

July 24, 2011 in corruption, DCFS, drugs, Florida, medication, neglect, parent-child relationship, parental rights

Lier Mental Hospital #2

Image by naustvik via Flickr

This evening I watched Saving Isaiah again, about a little boy who was adopted out after his crack addicted mother threw him out like garbage. When the adults stopped fighting over him, we were left to believe all was well. We all hope and pray that Isaiah has a happy ending.

When I decided to share Saving Isaiah with my Facebook friends, I found another Saving Isaiah that both shocked and horrified me. Though to be honest, Isaiah’s story doesn’t surprise me.

COMMITTED TO MENTAL WARD AT 6

Psychiatrists diagnosed Isaiah with post-traumatic stress disorder, a mental problem first studied in Vietnam veterans. He had night terrors and trouble sleeping. He flinched when a cashier at a water park asked him to wear a plastic bracelet to show he had paid. It triggered his memory of a hospital ID band.

Cheryll believes her son also has reactive attachment disorder, a problem in which early traumas prevent children from bonding normally with their parents. She wanted to take her son to one of the national centers that train parents to help severely disturbed children.

Nearly every day, Cheryll hounded DCF officials for the money. When she felt administrators were patronizing her, her temper came quick, like a sudden slap.

The state wouldn’t pay for the special treatment, but it did provide a psychiatrist, an after-school program and a therapist who came to the home to work with Isaiah nearly every day. In the summer after his kindergarten year, the state paid his tuition to a summer camp for emotionally disturbed children.

Isaiah believed that the entire world was out to hurt him. In his mind, even is mother could not be trusted and the state, predictably, does exactly the wrong thing to help this innocent child. They locked Isaiah up in the most terrifying place on earth and began to torture Isaiah with needles.

I can relate to his terror and I have to wonder how any parent can be so stupid. I am convinced that the mother is not without blame, but the story doesn’t give us those details.

When I was 8 years old my appendix burst and I was hospitalized for three weeks. It was touch-and-go for the first few days, they had inserted a drain tube to help drain off the poison that threatened to claim my life. Obviously, I made it through the ordeal…but at what cost?

I was given 3-injections daily for those 3-weeks, to help fight the poison, my drain tube was checked through-out the day as well and my dressings changed. I was in good hands, the staff, for the most, part treated me well.

I was really out of it for the first 3-days, then for the next 7-days I was terrified. I lived in total and constant fear. I was afraid to move the wrong way, for fear my guts would fall out. I knew they had cut me open, I knew that they had to clean my wound often but not a single person bothered to tell me that I had staples in my stomach. I didn’t find out until the doctor was half-way through removing them and I had the courage to ask him what he was doing.

Everyone was so busy “doing their job”, that no one considered actually letting the patient in on the process. You would be surprised at what very young children can understand. I was quite shocked one day, when someone I know well was babysitting a friends child. The child was acting out and instead of talking to the 18-months-old child and explaining things this person yanked the items out of the child’s hand, claiming that the child was too young to understand. Poppycock.

Children in the womb can understand love and affection. My grandchild used to really get moving around when I would read or sing to my daughter-in-laws swollen tummy. Children of all ages are very perceptive and can understand much more than we give them credit for. This case is especially difficult because the mother is a single mom. Raising a child is hard enough when you have two loving parents working together, but nearly impossible to do all alone.

This family needs your support.

Please contact Kathleen Chapman for details on where to make a donation to help Isaiah and his mother. This child needs specialized help and nothing less will do.

Contact Kathleen Chapman
kathleen_chapman@pbpost.com

 

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Advance Battle Plan…

April 20, 2011 in California, Child Protective Services, CPS, DCFS, DHS, family court, parental rights, termination of parental rights

If you speak to anyone who has ever dealt with the Child Protective Services (CPS) engine, they will likely tell you they wish they had been informed of their rights prior to the initial contact.

Most parents don’t believe CPS is a problem agency, until they have been contacted and frankly, by then it is simply too late. You can’t expect to win a battle when you don’t know or understand the rules of how the game is played.

Just ask any chess player. You must know the role of each piece and how they move and attack. Each piece is different and they all have their strengths and weaknesses, which can been leveraged to your advantage or used against you.

Don Lyons is a parent, who has faced CPS and won his battle — learning a lot about how the system works along the way. His precious girls were placed into the foster care system, he was threatened with the loss of his parental rights and suffered a litany of dirty tricks, lies and scandalous behavior. To his credit, he fought the system, Pro se and won.

Pro se legal representation refers to the instance of a person representing himself or herself without a lawyer in a court proceeding, whether as a defendant or a plaintiff and whether the matter is civil or criminal. Pro se is a Latin phrase meaning “for oneself”.

He explains the rules as they apply here in California and in most states. He walks you through the legal process and provides critical details that you must know, if you plan to beat the ugly beast known as family court.

Bill Sullivan writes,

“In his book, “Warning: The Truth about Child Protective Services and The Staggering Impact on Society,” my friend Don Lyons, documents 5 different ways they can get paid.

Also Many Judges’ retirement is tied to the number of cases where DCFS is deemed to be benefactor for the children or they actually sit on boards for the operators of Foster homes.

Don’s first book, Warning: The Truth About Child Protective Services and The Staggering Impact on Society, has been widely read and has helped many parents successfully gain the return of their children from state custody.

His new book will be announced shortly, so be sure to check back for more information on his latest book.

Those who have lost their children will be interested in reading Don’s book, but those who really need this book are the parents whose children are still safe at home. So please, at this special low-low-price, order two and send a copy to a friend or family member.

Regularly Priced at $19.95 – Get it today for only $4.95! This special deal won’t last forever, so order your copy today. Click below to order.

Warning: The Truth About Child Protective Services
and The Staggering Impact on Society

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